How to grow a full mustache. Nanoc » Filters

The following is a list of all filters that come bundled with Nanoc. Mustache options.

filter invokes the command-line tool of AsciiDoc. This filter takes no options.

For example, the following will convert an AsciiDoc page to HTML:

filter invokes Asciidoctor, a Ruby implementation of AsciiDoc. Unlike the

filter can be customized.

For example, the following will convert an AsciiDoc page to HTML:

filter invokes BlueCloth, a pure-Ruby implementation of Markdown. This filter takes no options.

For example, the following will convert a Markdown page to HTML:

filter runs the content through CoffeeScript. This filter takes no options.

For example, the following will convert CoffeeScript source code into JavaScript:

filter finds code blocks and attempts to syntax-highlight them.

element. The language of the code can be specified in two ways:

element has an HTML class attribute that starts with

, then the remainder of the class attribute will be used as the code language. For example, the following indicates a code block written in Ruby:

If the code block starts with a line that begins with

, then the remainder of the line will be used as the code language. For example, the following indicates a code block written in JSON:

By default, CodeRay will be used to highlight source code. For example, the following will colorize the syntax of all code blocks using CodeRay:

To change the colorizer, pass a symbol containing the name of a colorizer to

. For example, the following highlights all code blocks using Rouge:

filter:colorize_syntax, default_colorizer::rouge

Nanoc knows the following colorizers:

pygmentize, the command-line front end for Pygments, a syntax highlighter written in Python

Rouge, a pure-Ruby syntax highlighter with Pygments-compatible output

To configure individual highlighters, pass the options to the key for the highlighter. For example, the following will set the

filter:colorize_syntax, coderay: { line_numbers::list }

Syntax colorizers can be configured on a per-language basis. To do so, use a

option, passing in a hash where the keys are symbols corresponding to language names, and where the values are symbols corresponding to colorizer names. For example, in the following code snippet, Rouge would be used by default, except for XML, where it uses CodeRay:

filter:colorize_syntax, default_colorizer::rouge, colorizers: { xml::coderay }

filter by default assumes that the content to colorize is an HTML page fragment, rather than a full HTML page, and will therefore not add the HTML boilerplate at the top and bottom of the output. To rather treat the content as a full page, pass

to the filter. Typically, the

option is useful when the content is already fully laid out.

The syntax of the document to highlight is assumed to be HTML by default. To treat the document as XHTML instead, pass

elements even when they are not contained inside a

filter runs the content through eRuby, using the

For example, the following will process ERB source code:

The following example contains ERB code that iterates over all blog posts, and prints them as a header and an excerpt of the body:

ERB supports the following syntax:

, and substitutes the ERB instruction with the result of the expression.

Options

filter takes the following options:

) to use while running this filter. By default, this is 0, which means no taint checks are performed.

The trim mode to use, which changes the way ERB interprets its source. The ERB documentation lists the following trim modes:

enables Ruby code processing for lines beginning with

omit newline for lines starting with

omit newline for lines ending in

omit blank lines ending in

, the initial ERB example above could be written as follows:

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filter would have to be called with the proper trim mode set:

filter runs the content through eRuby, using Erubi. Options passed to this filter will be passed on to

For example, the following will process eRuby source code using Erubi:

filter runs the content through eRuby, using Erubis. This filter takes no options.

For example, the following will process eRuby source code using Erubis:

filter runs the content through Haml.

For example, the following will convert Haml into HTML:

The options that are given to this filter will be passed on to

. For example, this filter call set

filter:haml, format::html5

For example, the following will convert Handlebars content into HTML:

Content that is processed using the Handlebars filter can access the following data:

Returns the item attribute with the given name. For example,

in Handlebars are both evaluated as

Returns the layout attribute with the given name. This is only available in layouts. For example,

in Handlebars is evaluated as

Returns the configuration attribute with the given name.

Returns the content to be included in the layout. This is only available in layouts.

For example, this is a basic layout marked up with Handlebars:

This filter does not have any options.

filter invokes kramdown, a fast and featureful pure-Ruby implementation of Markdown. The filter converts to HTML.

For example, the following will convert a Markdown page to HTML:

Parameters that are passed to the filter are passed to

. For example, the following will also convert the content to HTML, as above, but disables the

filter:kramdown, auto_ids: false

filter runs content through Less, a CSS preprocessor.

For example, the following will process Less content:

This filter does not have any options.

filter runs content through Markaby, a method of writing markup as Ruby.

For example, the following will process Markaby content:

This filter does not have any options.

filter runs content through Maruku, a pure-Ruby Markdown-superset interpreter.

For example, the following will process Markdown content using Maruku:

The options that are passed to this filter will be passed on to Maruku’s

For example, the following will convert Mustache content into HTML:

Content that is processed using the Handlebars filter can access the following data:

Returns the item attribute with the given name. For example,

in Handlebars is evaluated as

Returns the content to be included in the layout. This is only available in layouts.

For example, this is a basic layout marked up with Mustache:

This filter does not have any options.

For example, the following will convert Pandoc content into HTML:

filter, pass them as an array for the

key. For example, the following will convert from Markdown to HTML, and enable the

filter runs CSS through Rainpress, a CSS compressor.

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For example, the following will compress CSS with Rainpress:

Options passed to this filter will be passed to Rainpress. See the file for a description of the options. For example, the following will retain newlines:

filter:rainpress, newlines: false

For example, the following will convert Markdown content into HTML using RDiscount:

Options can be passed as an array of symbols for the

key. For example, the following will convert from Markdown to HTML, and enable the

filter:rdiscount, extensions: [:smart,:filter_html ]

filter runs content through

For example, the following will convert RDoc content into HTML:

This filter takes no options.

For example, the following will convert Markdown content into HTML via Redcarpet:

This filter takes the following options:

A list of options to pass on to Redcarpet itself (not the renderer)

A list of options to pass on to the Redcarpet renderer

The class of the renderer to use (

Whether or not to add a table of contents

For example, the following will enable fenced code blocks:

filter:redcarpet, options: { fenced_code_blocks: true }

For example, the following will convert Textile content into HTML via RedCloth:

This filter takes the following options:

Set the value for the option key to

to enable or disable the option. For details, see the documentation for

For example, the following disable wrapping caps in a span:

filter:redcloth, no_span_caps: true

filter finds all absolute paths in (X)HTML or CSS content, and converts them into relative paths. This is particularly useful for sites that are not deployed at the root of a domain.

For example, the GitHub Pages site for D★Mark is hosted at https://ddfreyne.github.io/d-mark/. The D★Mark page has a reference to its stylesheet at, which the

filter turns into, so that the stylesheet can be found even if the site is not deployed at the root of the domain.

option specifies the type of content, and can be

. This option must be specified, as the filter cannot reliably determine the type of content by itself.

For example, the following will convert all absolute paths in HTML content to relative ones:

filter:relativize_paths, type::html5

attributes will be relativized. In CSS, all

references will be relativized.

To customize which attributes to normalize in (X)HTML, pass a list of XPath selectors to the

option. Selectors are prefixed with

automatically. For example, the following will only relativize paths if they occur within

attributes on any element anywhere in the document:

If custom namespaces in XHTML are passed to the

option, they also have to be explicitly defined in the

option is a hash where the keys are the prefixes, and the values are the namespace URIs.

To exclude paths from being relativized, use the

option can be any of the following:

The path will not be relativized if the regular expression matches.

The path will not be relativized when the path starts with one or more components that matches the given string.

The path will not be relativized if any of the elements of the array match, using the aforementioned rules for

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For example, the following will prevent all paths to /cgi-bin from being relativized:

filter:relativize_paths, type::html5, exclude: ' /cgi-bin '

filter transforms content using RubyPants, which translates plain ASCII punctuation characters into “smart” typographic punctuation HTML entities.

The following will run RubyPants:

This filter takes no options.

filter converts a Sass stylesheet to CSS. For example:

The options that are given to this filter will be passed on to

option. For example, this filter call set

filter:sass, style::compact

You can evaluate Ruby code from within your Sass code using the

Sass function. It takes a string containing Ruby code (a

Sass::Script::Value::String

.title { content: " My wonderful web site " ; }

Sass function can also take an

parameter, which removes quotation marks:

.tip { color: #990099 ; }

filter produces a source map for a rendered Sass stylesheet. For example:

path = @item.identifier.without_ext + '.css ' filter:sass_sourcemap, css_path: path, sourcemap_path: path + '.map '

filters must be passed the same options.

filter runs the content through Slim, a lightweight templating engine. For example:

Options passed to this filter will be passed to

Slim::Template#initialize

filter runs the content through Typogruby, a Ruby variant of Typogrify for typographically enhancing text. For example:

This filter takes no options.

filter passes JavaScript content through Uglifier, a Ruby wrapper for UglifyJS. For example:

This filter takes options and passes them on to

. For example, the following will disable name mangling and enable support for Harmony mode (ES6/ES2015+):

filter:uglify_js, mangle: false, harmony: true

filter runs the item content through an XSLT stylesheet using Nokogiri.

This filter can only be run for layouts, because it will need both the XML to convert (the item content) as well as the XSLT stylesheet (the layout content).

For example, the following specifies that items matching /reports

Additional parameters can be passed to the layout call. These parameters will be turned into

elements. For example, the following layout rule adds an additional parameter named

filter compresses JavaScript or CSS using the YUICompressor gem.

For example, the following compresses CSS content:

option must be specified. The

option can be set to either

, corresponding with CSS and JavaScript.

This filter takes options and passes them on to

YUICompressor.compress

. For details on which options are available, consult the

YUICompressor.compress

documentation. For example, the following will enable name munging in JavaScript:

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